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Hang gliding general :: RE: Waterproof HG cover?

24 April, 2017 - 21:09
Author: kermit
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:09 pm (GMT -8)

got two from rusty

Hang gliding general :: RE: Hang Glider storage solutions

24 April, 2017 - 20:17
Author: CAL
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 12:17 pm (GMT -8)

jheissjr wrote: CAL wrote: videos shows all https://youtu.be/RMRVTrRgfyQ

I like your setup. How is the rope locked in place when you lift the wing and release the rope? Does the lift coexist with a garage door opener?

here is the rope system, it has a catch on it that if you pull to one side it catches. or if you let go of it, it will catch so if you accidentally let go it does not fall to the ground and break what ever you are hoisting

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cartman-Kayak-Hoist-Lift-Garage-Storage-Canoe-Hoists-100-Pound-Working-Capacity-/322184822392?hash=item4b03b63e78:g:FHgAAOSwZ1BXfl1Cund
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Hang gliding Videos :: Hang & Para PR Video?

24 April, 2017 - 20:10
Author: ChattaroyMan
Subject: Hang & Para PR Video?
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 12:10 pm (GMT -8)

I'm looking for the best possible hang/para video(s) that represents our sports in a fashion that is appropriate for the uniformed - such as any private land owners or public officials that would be gate keepers on opening up a new site. Ideally, it should be short (5-mins, 10 tops). Something one could show at a public gathering where the viewer comes away with a decent understanding of the differences and similarities of hangs and paras and what it takes to launch and land them. Any candidates?
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Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: carbiner

24 April, 2017 - 19:17
Author: peanuts
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 11:17 am (GMT -8)

I use a Wiinchester

Hang gliding general :: RE: Hang Glider storage solutions

24 April, 2017 - 18:41
Author: blindrodie
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:41 am (GMT -8)

Frikin BRILLIANT Cal...


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Hang gliding general :: RE: What to do with well-used or very old gliders--

24 April, 2017 - 18:09
Author: red
Subject: What to do with well-used or very old gliders--
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:09 am (GMT -8)

MorphFX wrote: samarth2004 wrote: Hi!

Cheers!
Samarth Now that first picture has got my interest now... what's going on there then? MorrphFX,

This is what is going on . . .
http://www.hanggliding.org/wiki/Soaring_simulators#Real.2C_Hands-On_HG_Simulator_:
The text article there linked with it will explain things.
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Hang gliding general :: RE: Gourdon in July

24 April, 2017 - 16:57
Author: jloopingBE
Subject: Contact Gourdon
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 8:57 am (GMT -8)

Hi,

I would contact Eric Angles, can be found on FB:
https://www.facebook.com/AtoutVents

Enjoy your flights there, it's beautiful (avoid the coast though)

Jeremy
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Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 15:56
Author: aeroexperiments
Subject: momentum?
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:56 am (GMT -8)

For an exhaustive on-line discussion questioning the idea that the production of lift inevitably involves giving some momentum to the surrounding airmass, see this topic on a model-airplane forum http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2805910-Momentum-Survey and other related threads in the "Modeling Science" area.

I haven't followed the whole discussion very closely, but I've noticed that "ShoeDLG"'s posts are usually enlightening.

Steve

Nigel Hewitt wrote: I always worry that the wind tunnel image, although useful gives a wrong impression. The air isn't flowing over the wing, it was just sitting there, minding its own business when this wing rushed past and threw it about. Yes, we know that on short scales there is no difference between who is moving but lift and drag make more 'sense' when you look at what you leave behind. Air has been accelerated forwards, 'dragged' along by the wing and accelerated downwards 'lifting' the aerofoil. It will all settle down in time and get back to what ever it was doing before but we have extracted some mass times acceleration style forces from it as we passed.

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: carbiner

24 April, 2017 - 15:09
Author: Wonder Boy
Subject: Re: carbiner
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:09 am (GMT -8)

sohrab wrote: A question !! , I am flying same carbiner now for 15 years , should i replace it ?

What's the possible harm from doing so vs the possible harm in not?
_________________
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Everyone who lives dies, yet not everyone who dies, has lived.
We take these risks not to escape life, but to prevent life escaping us.


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Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 13:11
Author: ksglider
Subject: Re: Theory of lift
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:11 am (GMT -8)

SeeMarkFly;

SeeMarkFly wrote: How about if you suck the air off the top of the wing?


Link


Look up the topic of the Custer Channel Wing. Very interesting concepts from the 1950's. As I remember, there was a BIG increase in lift at very low speeds, but LARGE drag at cruise speeds.

Again, fun stuff to talk about . . .

Doug

Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 13:02
Author: ksglider
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:02 am (GMT -8)

Nigel;

Nigel Hewitt wrote: I always worry that the wind tunnel image, although useful gives a wrong impression. The air isn't flowing over the wing, it was just sitting there, minding its own business when this wing rushed past and threw it about. Yes, we know that on short scales there is no difference between who is moving but lift and drag make more 'sense' when you look at what you leave behind. Air has been accelerated forwards, 'dragged' along by the wing and accelerated downwards 'lifting' the aerofoil. It will all settle down in time and get back to what ever it was doing before but we have extracted some mass times acceleration style forces from it as we passed.

The whole 'how far does the air travel?' question is a fallacy that comes from this image. The air isn't flowing over the wing. It is being pushed out of the way and accelerated. The air that goes over the wing and the air that goes under it were once adjacent but have now been pushed apart and have no interest in getting back together. The air going over the wing is not 'going faster', the air under the wing is just being dragged along more and accelerated.

I'm not sure what is a good image to help understand it. We humans tend to apply our simple world ideas to complicated things like this and even as a time served physicist I catch myself doing it at times. Looking at the pressure tells you where the lift comes from and the pressure tells the air how to move.

I like your way of looking at this.

I especially like your last phrase. It's kind of like the really simple explanation of The General Theory of Relativity, "Mass tells space how to 'bend'; 'bent' space tells mass how to move".

Fun stuff to talk about . . .

Doug

Hang gliding general :: Gourdon in July

24 April, 2017 - 12:16
Author: flyingcat
Subject: Gourdon in July
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 4:16 am (GMT -8)

I'm going down to Nice, France for two weeks in July on a road trip with my SO and I might score a couple of days of flying if the weather permits (fingers crossed!).
The furthest that I can get without upsetting my companion is Gourdon since it's only an hour drive away from where we're going to be staying.

I found this guide to Gourdon from Ozone (the paraglider maker) and from videos in YouTube not only have I seen that the place is gorgeous but also that the landing seems quite big.
But I would like to hear from others' experience on what are the things to avoid, where not to go (I fly a floater so I'm only planning on sticking to the valley so no big XC plans here).
How do the valley winds work here? When should I not fly? And most importantly, where is the house thermal? ;)

Perhaps you know and can put me in touch with locals to the site, maybe a local club (that speaks English/Dutch/Spanish?), that would be great and highly appreciated!

Thank you all for your input.

Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 11:59
Author: Nigel Hewitt
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:59 am (GMT -8)

I always worry that the wind tunnel image, although useful gives a wrong impression. The air isn't flowing over the wing, it was just sitting there, minding its own business when this wing rushed past and threw it about. Yes, we know that on short scales there is no difference between who is moving but lift and drag make more 'sense' when you look at what you leave behind. Air has been accelerated forwards, 'dragged' along by the wing and accelerated downwards 'lifting' the aerofoil. It will all settle down in time and get back to what ever it was doing before but we have extracted some mass times acceleration style forces from it as we passed.

The whole 'how far does the air travel?' question is a fallacy that comes from this image. The air isn't flowing over the wing. It is being pushed out of the way and accelerated. The air that goes over the wing and the air that goes under it were once adjacent but have now been pushed apart and have no interest in getting back together. The air going over the wing is not 'going faster', the air under the wing is just being dragged along more and accelerated.

I'm not sure what is a good image to help understand it. We humans tend to apply our simple world ideas to complicated things like this and even as a time served physicist I catch myself doing it at times. Looking at the pressure tells you where the lift comes from and the pressure tells the air how to move.
_________________
nigelH
Avian Rio 15, Aeros Target and Aeros Phantom
Waterboarding at Guantanamo Bay sounded like a radical holiday opportunity until I looked it up.

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: How often do you replace your carabiner?

24 April, 2017 - 11:45
Author: sohrab
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:45 am (GMT -8)

A question !! should i replace my carbine after 15 years?

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: carbiner

24 April, 2017 - 11:39
Author: sohrab
Subject: carbiner
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:39 am (GMT -8)

A question !! , I am flying same carbiner now for 15 years , should i replace it ?

Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 10:38
Author: RobertKesselring
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 2:38 am (GMT -8)

adyr wrote: A flat, plane wing can fly just fine. It's not as good as a profiled one, but still it can fly.
TjW wrote: Worse, a wing that does have camber can still fly when it's upside down.
Yes. You can get lift with almost any airfoil if you set the AoA such that the airflow gets curved downward. Using flat or inverted airfoils will incur more drag, but as long as you can maintain airspeed against the increased drag, it will still fly. The important thing is getting that downward curvature in the airflow.
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Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 10:18
Author: CHassan
Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 2:18 am (GMT -8)

waveview wrote: It's sounds like a bit of a mistery about what keeps us all up in the air? These hang gliders are even more improbable after listening to the physics involved.

Hang gliders don't fly at all. They always fall.
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Flying Stories + Flight Reports :: RE: Names to Faces. The Challenge.

24 April, 2017 - 06:10
Author: Yourpictures
Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 10:10 pm (GMT -8)

Hello, does anyone know who Capt Dave Blood, Blair Andrews, Rolly, Mike Miller, Jim Lee, Rob Kelly, or Marianne??

If so I have found a lot of photos of them and there hang gliding adventures from the 70's & 80's. And there is LOTS OF THEM. I don't want to throw them away so I'm on here trying to find the owner of these photos. I live in Los Angeles. Please feel free to contact me either by text or by phone call at (818) 216-5151. Thanks, Jeff Shaffer

Hang gliding general :: RE: A theory of how lift is generated by a wing is debunked.

24 April, 2017 - 05:47
Author: TjW
Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 9:47 pm (GMT -8)

adyr wrote: Quote:
why it happens

Physics does not answer to the question 'why', it only gives description of 'how'. The 'why' goes to philosophy or religion

Quote:
A wing is curved.

Not necessarily. A flat, plane wing can fly just fine. It's not as good as a profiled one, but still it can fly.

To understand how things go one has to think in terms of the particles involved, about the collisions among them and with the wing...

Worse, a wing that does have camber can still fly when it's upside down.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Hang Glider storage solutions

24 April, 2017 - 02:50
Author: cdobsonus
Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:50 pm (GMT -8)

I store my Glider and rack together...
[youtube]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AdCJqoiTn0I[/youtube]