News from HangGliding.org

Syndicate content Hang Gliding Org
Updated: 2 hours 2 min ago

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

21 April, 2017 - 21:58
Author: Eteamjack
Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 1:58 pm (GMT -8)

once&future wrote: Jack,

You talk about insurance. At 71 doesn't Medicare cover most of it? If not what additional insurance do you need? Those of us nearing Medicare age need to know what to plan for. Yes medicare will cover most. Prior to that I had employer
Supplied insurance. Supplemental ins by blue shield big help. I just cant imagine
No insurance at all.
_________________
H4 (1979) Lake Elsinore. Ca. U2 160 (Sweet)
"If Your One Who Doesn't Succeed At First Maybe Hanggliding's Not For You"

"Don't take life seriously it isn't permanent"

Hang gliding general :: RE: What to do with well-used or very old gliders--

21 April, 2017 - 20:25
Author: magentabluesky
Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:25 pm (GMT -8)

I am vacating my hanger in Big Bear and need to send four gliders to the retirement home:

AMF Voit Proto-type Glider (standard 20”) missing some tubes.

Epper Standard

Wills Wing Alpha (1978) 215

Up Comet 165

Would not want to fly them any higher than I would want to fall.

They would make great displays.

I also have Hang Gliding magazines dating back to 1978, boxes and boxes.

Michael

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: Cross wind landing

21 April, 2017 - 17:44
Author: aeroexperiments
Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:44 am (GMT -8)

Sorry Jonathon I really didn't read your posts carefully enough before replying-- I asked you to spell out what we should see in the video, when actually you already had done that-- deleted my replies

To me it's legit to refer to the glider's inherent yaw stability/ directional stability in flight as "weathervane stability". I agree that the pivot point is slightly different on the ground than in flight-- if the hang strap is tight and the pilot's feet are on the ground and not sliding sideways then the pivot point is the hang point. If the glider is on the pilot's shoulders then the point of contact between the shoulders and the down tubes is the pivot point. On a tailwheel airplane with the tailwheel off the ground (or freely castoring) then the pivot point is between the main wheels, well ahead of the CG, so the effect is especially powerful. Not sure why you are referencing the canopy of a sailplane.

Also in my post above where I say "anytime the pilot's feet are off the ground" I'm only speaking of the general case where the glider is not being affected by a gradient, i.e. the glider has not recently moved through a gradient but rather is at equilibrium with the wind...

Steve

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

21 April, 2017 - 02:17
Author: miraclepieco
Subject: Re: April Fools Day Got Me
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 6:17 pm (GMT -8)

Eteamjack wrote: There is no getting back on the horse for this 71 yr old.

Do you think your age was a factor? If you were still in your 30s, might you have had the physical ability to run out this launch?

.

Hang gliding general :: RE: LZ windsock design details?

21 April, 2017 - 02:15
Author: dbotos
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 6:15 pm (GMT -8)

Baitrunner wrote: dbotos wrote: Baitrunner wrote: that wasn't an orange/white/blue Falcon 4 195 was it?

Nope - this is a Falcon 3 195 - yellow and white. Did you buy that nice F4 195?

Yes I did - my first wing!!!!

Excellent! My first as well.

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

21 April, 2017 - 02:13
Author: dbotos
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 6:13 pm (GMT -8)

Jack,

Thanks for telling your story and glad you‘re here to tell it. Hopefully it will help others stay safe.

Did they check you for aortic arch tear at the hospital? Sometimes that can result from chest or inertial trauma and can be a latent killer. Hope you make a full recovery!

David

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

21 April, 2017 - 00:35
Author: flybop
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:35 pm (GMT -8)

Thanks for telling your story. We all need to do everything we can to be as safe as we can. This is true,not only in aviation, but in everything we do.

Good luck with your recovery. Keep us posted.
_________________
What a beautiful day! Let's go jump off a mountain!!!

"He did not know he could not fly and so he did" Guy Clark,

"The Cape" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6bZ37nexSY

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: south carolina school or instructor

21 April, 2017 - 00:29
Author: dad1966
Subject: south carolina school or instructor
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:29 pm (GMT -8)

Hello new to the sport, does anyone know of schools or instructors in Sc. I live in Aiken Sc , can travel to georgia or north carolina, but nags head is to far. thank you for any help

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

20 April, 2017 - 23:02
Author: NMERider
Subject: Re: Costs
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 3:02 pm (GMT -8)

Eteamjack wrote: ....Bills have already began flowing in. $2500 for ambulance. Please if you fly do it
realizing what the costs will be if you screw up as I did with no insurance. I have insurance and would never have participated in this sport without it. My retirement funds would have grown wings and departed me. P.S. you don't need to comment on what a lucky SOB I am already know.
Jack,
I'm always grateful to read a sign-off written by the pilot and not by the executor, bereaved spouse, sad friend or news media. You're a lucky SOB because you enjoyed 38 years in this sport and not because you lived to write your own farewell message. The health insurance/finance statement is worth noting for everyone. There have been a few contribution campaigns here and many more elsewhere for hapless pilots who crashed without adequate or any health coverage. Even the most self-confident pilot can let his/her guard down for one moment and that's all it takes to become bankrupt along with one's family. Of course if it wasn't for under-insured pilots, there'd be far fewer students and equipment sold so this is a sad irony.
Your earlier message about putting on a show for a spectator has killed or injured more pilots than most of us may realize. Spectators include other pilots whether they are flying or not. As much as hang gliding is best pursued as a buddy sport not unlike SCUBA, ultimately, one has to be utterly selfish and self-centered in order to remain safe.
I hope to see you out there by the Oak tree this season. You're not getting any farewell from me. I need an OTB driver for my next beach flight.
Cheers,
Jonathan
_________________
http://www.youtube.com/glidela

Hang gliding general :: RE: April Fools Day Got Me

20 April, 2017 - 21:56
Author: Eteamjack
Subject: Costs
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:56 pm (GMT -8)

Bills have already began flowing in. $2500 for ambulance. Please if you fly do it
realizing what the costs will be if you screw up as I did with no insurance. I have insurance and would never have participated in this sport without it. My retirement funds would have grown wings and departed me. P.S. you don't need to comment on what a lucky SOB I am already know.
_________________
H4 (1979) Lake Elsinore. Ca. U2 160 (Sweet)
"If Your One Who Doesn't Succeed At First Maybe Hanggliding's Not For You"

"Don't take life seriously it isn't permanent"

Incident Reports :: RE: Hook Knives Save Lives!!!!

20 April, 2017 - 21:41
Author: jlatorre
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:41 pm (GMT -8)

kukailimoku wrote: 1. If not for a hook knife one of my best friends would be dead. Glad he had it...



I think I remember that incident.

That was when we were flying at Marina Beach, which is like a lot of coastal sites in that if you go into the water, you're toast unless you can cut yourself out of trouble before the surf takes your glider on a trip to Davy Jones.

My knife of choice was an Opinel lanyarded to the harness. But any knife is better than no knife.
_________________
"Good judgment is the product of experience. Experience is the product of bad judgment."

-- old aviation proverb

Hang gliding general :: April Fools Day Got Me

20 April, 2017 - 21:32
Author: Eteamjack
Subject: April Fools Day Got Me
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:32 pm (GMT -8)

Sat Apr 1st started like a normal day then things went crazy. On the way to Elsinore a big rig driver tried to kill me (not joking). About 5 miles from Elsinore the freeway came to a complete stop. Someone had rolled their vehicle. Got there
about half hour late, but everyone was still at the LZ. We loaded the wings on my truck as it is large enough to carry several. Conditions were light Santa Ana winds from the North North East. We drove to the Edwards launch where we probably should have stayed and checked conditions. Conditions were light just soarable. Majority wanted to travel further to the E launch which I did not have a problem with. Upon arriving found the wind blowing in pretty consistently. We chose to remain there. Back flag was reflecting
moderate North winds which is not optimum for the E launch. Launch was closer to North East @ 8 mph which is good. Approx 6 hangs and 6 pg's. Bill Sod first to
launch scratching for several minutes before breaking for LZ. After several minutes Bill arose from the LZ climbing to I believe 6K. The remainder of the hangs launched pretty much experiencing same conditions. Eric D was also able to make a low save. All the PG's took off climbing 500 over, Then a big flush cycle came along and they all disappeared beneath the ridgeline. Couple of them also made low saves. This left only me by myself. Dave Beardslee
the only remaining person at launch was about to truck back to the LZ. As I walked up to launch the wind subsided. After couple of minutes my thoughts were I'm not going to do this with no witnesses. Out of no where a wuffo rides up on his cycle and begins chatting with Dave. Ok now that issue is null. Wind begins to cycle back in at maybe 4 mph. The following is additional information I feel helps partially explain my launch failure. Three weeks before I had made major adjustments to my harness. Test flew it at Crestline and was
happy with changes. My shoulder and leg loops were seriously out of adjustment. The landing was the best I had made on this wing since purchase. When I flared it rotated really sweetly and I made a no step. Back to the E. Fearing my spectators were going to abandon me I committed to launch. I had a bad habit of using a jack rabbit start and when I felt the wing was flying the angle of attack would increase as I proned out. Many people had commented on this issue and I honestly tried to correct (unsuccessfully). Started my run down the launch in light wind. Felt the tug on the hang loop and felt the wing lifting signalling me to go prone which I did. Soon as I proned out I felt the wing seriously mush. The right wing tip made contact with a bush at the very end of launch. I powered through it, but the damage was done. Right wing stalled as I left the mountain. Began a spiraling helicopter turn to the right circling back in to the face of the mountain. I saw nothing but large boulders in front with one large bush which unfortunately I missed. The wing made contact and slung me chest first into a very hard boulder. My parachute took the majority of the abuse. As my upper body came to a very abrupt stop my left leg flung around and made serious contact with a secondary boulder. I was approximately 200 ft below launch in very ugly terrain. My leg was caught up in the rear cables and I had way too much tension to unhook myself. Dave showed up after a few minutes. He also was unsuccessful at unhooking me. Neither of us had a knife. 911 had already been called before Dave started down. The fire dept responded quickly as they're just down the street. First res ponder also had no cutting tools. He made assessments of my condition and radio'd for someone to bring cutting tools and a basket. Now were gettig somewhere. Shortly several others were on site. Leg was freed from the cables and hang loop cut allowing me to drop to the ground. By now shock had set in and I had pretty much given in. I was cut out of my harness and rolled into basket. No real pain until this activity began. Firemen informed me a helicopter extraction was the only means to get me back up to the road. Shortly it arrived but I had to be moved to a space the cable could access safely. This was a pretty painful endeavor. The wing could not be dismantled so I gave permission to cut it apart so it could not become entangled with the helicopter. The cable came down and I was hoisted into helicopter. Couple of minutes later I was being transferred into an ambulance. Trauma center is about 5 miles away. Ambulance crew did their best, but the ride was a painful one because of the mountain roads. Shortly thereafter we arrived at the trauma center. Lots of xrays determined I had a broken femure. Several broken ribs and cracked sternum. The sternum is the center of all pain . Couldnt eat, sleep,breath, cough, laugh or even move without excruciating pain. Didnt even know I had serious leg issue, Thank God for pain killers.
Dr operated on the femur the following day. Spent a week in hospital mostly as I couldn't begin any rehabilitation because of sternum. Finally got home after
a very uncomfortable stay. A lot of things at the hospital could have been done to make things better, but they weren't. Home now with the wife as my nurse and she is doing a very admirable job. Everything is on the mend only issue is I'm being treated for blood clot issues. Prognosis 3 mo recovery as long as clotting issue is resolved. I bring this story to you emphasize the importance of not allowing the angle of attack to increase until mush. This whole incident is attributed to pilot error. Pilot error is most serious during launch and landing.

Thanks for reading and know this is not the way I wanted to end 38 yrs of the most rewarding experiences anyone might experience. There is no getting back on the horse for this 71 yr old.
_________________
H4 (1979) Lake Elsinore. Ca. U2 160 (Sweet)
"If Your One Who Doesn't Succeed At First Maybe Hanggliding's Not For You"

"Don't take life seriously it isn't permanent"

Hang gliding Videos :: Sycamore Ridge + Industrial/Urban Soaring 2017.04.19

20 April, 2017 - 18:29
Author: NMERider
Subject: Sycamore Ridge + Industrial/Urban Soaring 2017.04.19
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:29 am (GMT -8)

2:48hrs of technique work in my Tenax 3 (butt-lever pitch adj) in plenty of turbulence and 42 miles of nice touring over mountains, suburbs and industrial areas!


Link


The big story of the day was Mitch Riley, who will compete in this year's X-Alps setting a new PG site record of 102 miles in just over 7 hours. His was an extremely difficult flight that took nearly 3 hours to really get going. https://www.xcontest.org/world/en/flights/detail:mitchriley/19.04.2017/18:53
_________________
http://www.youtube.com/glidela

Hang gliding general :: RE: LZ windsock design details?

20 April, 2017 - 17:30
Author: Baitrunner
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:30 am (GMT -8)

dbotos wrote: Baitrunner wrote: that wasn't an orange/white/blue Falcon 4 195 was it?

Nope - this is a Falcon 3 195 - yellow and white. Did you buy that nice F4 195?

Yes I did - my first wing!!!!

Hang gliding general :: RE: barrels release without any tension except weight of rope..

20 April, 2017 - 16:50
Author: adyr
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:50 am (GMT -8)

I have one of those from the video above. One of them is mine

There are indeed better ones (newer Koch model?), in the sense that the pins have more mobility. Those from the video are good quality and they work well.

Hang gliding general :: RE: LZ windsock design details?

20 April, 2017 - 16:42
Author: dbotos
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:42 am (GMT -8)

I will have to practice my natural wind indicator reading ability - that could certainly come in handy.

I checked areal density of some flagging tape yesterday and was surprised that it was the "heaviest" of all materials considered so far:

Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: How often do you replace your carabiner?

20 April, 2017 - 16:28
Author: thermaleo
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:28 am (GMT -8)

If your carabiner should fail in flight, you will likely die. However carabiners very rarely fail. That said, it can happen. Many years ago we tested a dozen or more aluminum 'biners to fail - only one failed at less than the rated strength of c.2000lbs - but it failed at half that, which if you think about it is only around 4g for an average pilot weight..... Many pilots then started using two, but that made hooking in and unhooking a pain, and potentially hazardous in strong winds.

If you are flying on one aluminum carabiner, then don't. Spend c.$20 and get a steel one. And get a twistlock one that you can undo with one hand, not a screwgate one that may need both hands to undo in an emergency. If you land in a 30 mph wind you won't have two hands available to unhook!

Leo Jones

Hang gliding general :: RE: LZ windsock design details?

20 April, 2017 - 16:09
Author: dbotos
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:09 am (GMT -8)

Baitrunner wrote: that wasn't an orange/white/blue Falcon 4 195 was it?

Nope - this is a Falcon 3 195 - yellow and white. Did you buy that nice F4 195?

Hang gliding general :: RE: Reno pilots

20 April, 2017 - 16:04
Author: TomN
Posted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 8:04 am (GMT -8)

Alex Cuddy, I know his dad use to fly but not sure if he flew with Bill Bennett.